Clenbuterol is a drug prescribed to sufferers of breathing disorders as a decongestant and bronchodilator. People with chronic breathing disorders like asthma use this as a bronchodilator to make breathing easier. It is most commonly available in salt form as Clenbuterol hydrochloride. Clenbuterol is often mistaken for a steroid because of its illicit use in athletics.
Clenbuterol is known by the following brand names:
Broncodil, Broncoterol, Cesbron, Clenasma, Clenbuter.Pharmachim, Contrasmina, Contraspasmina, Monores, Novegam, Oxyflux, Prontovent, Spiropent, Ventolase, and Ventapulmin It is generally available in 20 – 40 mcg tablets, although syrup, injectables and “Super Clen” (x20 the normal dosage of normal tabs) are also somewhat popular.

Veterinary use of clenbuterol

Clenbuterol is used worldwide for the treatment of allergic respiratory disease in horses as it is a bronchodilator. A common trade name is Ventipulmin. It can be used both orally and intravenously. It is also a non-steroidal anabolic and metabolism accelerator, through a mechanism not well understood. Its ability to induce weight gain and a greater proportion of muscle to fat makes its illegal use in livestock popular.

Effects of the use of clenbuterol

In terms of action this drug is best likened to the now also illegal ephedrine and its legal replacement, ma huang. All of them operate mainly by increasing the manufacture and secretion of catabolic hormones known as cathecholamines (like dopamine, epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline)) which are secreted from the adrenal region. Now these hormones have a wide variety of functions. First of all they seem to alter the contractile characteristics of smooth muscle, but very specifically. Some will apparently be stimulated, and others inhibited. Amongst those inhibited, the smooth muscles in the bronchial tree, which explains its soothing effect in patients with breathing problems. What it also does is increase thermogenisis. This usually encompasses a rise in blood pressure, a stimulatory effect of the heart muscle and a resulting rise in body temperature.
Along with the reversing of the effects of insulin (and inhibiting the action of insulin) which results in a release of glycogen back into the blood stream as glucose and an inability to store or use more glycogen, it will increase the rate of protein and fat being burned in the body. For bodybuilders that appears to be the primary use of the drug. This thermogenisis and an increase in the rate of fat being burned usually has as a result that the metabolic rate of the subject its much higher and he burns more calories. This in turn results in loss of adipose tissue (the shedding of fat in other words) revealing a leaner physique with cuts and striations. The downside to this effect is that there is a concomitant rise in the rate of protein being burned. Where fat is robbed from the fatty tissue in the body, protein is generally robbed from the muscle. As with all catabolic hormones, in time muscle loss can and will occur.
Among the other actions that cathecholamines have is an increase in aerobic capacity (facilitated by the easier breathing), a stimulation of the nervous system (facilitated by norepinephrine and acetylcholine release) and thus the skeletal muscle system, an increase in oxygen transportation (facilitated by the increased blood pressure) and an increase in vigil. These characteristics in turn combine to make this drug particularly interesting for athletes doing endurance sports and needing a boost. Especially in middle-long running numbers, this drug is widely abused and its no secret that in cycling circles clenbuterol in liquid form is combined with a painkiller and the drug EPO (synthetic erythropoeitin, a renal hormone) which increases the manufacture of red blood cells. It is then injected along the road, thereby avoiding positive tests prior to the race. Needless to say such a cocktail is very hazardous to the cardiovascular system. Just to demonstrate the wide use of this drug and its immense popularity among athletes, observe the US Olympic team. Exercise-induced asthma is an afflmiction that generally occurs in 3-7% of the population, and is in some rare cases treated with clenbuterol. In 2000 60% of US Olympic athletes claimed to have exercise-induced asthma and ALL of them were prescribed clenbuterol for this condition. An otherwise illegal drug, tolerated solely for this reason. And this while the Romanian gymnast Andrea Raducan was stripped of her gold medal for the 25 µg of norephedrine in her cold medicin she was taking…

What are some of Clenbuterol’s side effects?

Possible side effects of Clenbuterol include restlessness, palpitations, tremor (involuntary trembling of fingers), headache, increased perspiration, insomnia, possible muscle spasms, increased blood pres-sure, and nausea.
Another thing people should be aware of is the inherent liver toxicity associated with clenbuterol use.

Food contamination

In September 2006 over 330 people in Shanghai were reported to have been poisoned by eating pork contaminated by Clenbuterol that had been fed to the animals to keep their meat lean.

Legal Status

As of fall, 2006, Clenbuterol is not an ingredient of any therapeutic drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but is still used as an unproven slimming aid, and is now banned for IOC-tested athletes. Jason Grimsley, former Major League baseball pitcher, admitted to using this drug. The tennis player Mariano Puerta was once penalized for use of clenbuterol. Australian wrestler Mitchil Mann was also suspended for testing positive for the drug.

We strongly suggest to stay natural and avoid the use of this dangerous drug unless your doctor prescribes it to you.

Sources: wikipedia, bodybuilding.com

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